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Thread: Martial Arts

  1. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Segadoway View Post
    yeah he is the guy that worked with kostya tzu and yes i am in australia, i suppose it would be a scientific approach i didnt really think of it like that, by practical i meant more applicable to real life situations, other styles of wing chun arent as "practical"
    Yeah, thats the guy that wrote a load of stuff that broke down elements of wing chun to a mathematical equation, not had the pleasure of meeting him.

    Being that wing chun is by its very nature is one of the most applicable arts to real life situations i feel your statement invites disagreement, i only wish i had a penny for every time someone argued their art was more valid to real life situations than another. I would agree that some schools focus differently and i would also agree that there are some shockingly bad schools out there and not just wing chun schools.

    I think "real life situation" is a very vague and subjective, for instance, when we train with marines and other military personnel the training has a completely different focus to when we train with civilians aged 50. Both training dynamics relate to real life but the "real life" is different for each. i remember i once went on a seminar focussing on firearms stripping and all kinds of stealthly stuff, it was interesting and an friend who was in the army thought it was brilliant and really useful to him but for my real life it had a lot less validity but we both had real lives, his life means that he doesn't always live in the most desirable places, my life means i have a lot less use for some of the stuff he's learnt.


    Wing chun is inherent of quick and simple forceful attacks and no nonsense defence to be used when an altercation is unavoidable, the main crux of the system and the training is about enabling the practitioner to have the structure, balance, power and timing to simply avoid being hit and to hit or incapacitate what is trying to attack you - all seems pretty applicable to real life. Once you have learnt the system you gain enough understanding to take away things that you feel are not necessary...thats the same with all arts but the things one person discards are the things that work best for another...in that sense you may find some small amount of movements or perhaps a shape or two that aren't applicable for you personally but thats the best i can logically reason for the cause of your statement. Most civilians never want an altercation and are just happy to have the tools there ready to help if it is ever needed, generally with WC being a small system a level of proficiency isn't a life time to achieve, the methods of training also allow people to get past to much rationalisation and allow the brain to soak a lot of things up as a natural body reaction, again this seems practical and applicable to real modern lifestyles. I find it very hard to appreciate an opinion that suggests that that is not practical, what does lee do that is more practical? what does wing chun do that is not practical?
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  2. #47
    Registered User Segadoway's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by straightXed View Post
    Yeah, thats the guy that wrote a load of stuff that broke down elements of wing chun to a mathematical equation, not had the pleasure of meeting him.

    Being that wing chun is by its very nature is one of the most applicable arts to real life situations i feel your statement invites disagreement, i only wish i had a penny for every time someone argued their art was more valid to real life situations than another. I would agree that some schools focus differently and i would also agree that there are some shockingly bad schools out there and not just wing chun schools.

    I think "real life situation" is a very vague and subjective, for instance, when we train with marines and other military personnel the training has a completely different focus to when we train with civilians aged 50. Both training dynamics relate to real life but the "real life" is different for each. i remember i once went on a seminar focussing on firearms stripping and all kinds of stealthly stuff, it was interesting and an friend who was in the army thought it was brilliant and really useful to him but for my real life it had a lot less validity but we both had real lives, his life means that he doesn't always live in the most desirable places, my life means i have a lot less use for some of the stuff he's learnt.


    Wing chun is inherent of quick and simple forceful attacks and no nonsense defence to be used when an altercation is unavoidable, the main crux of the system and the training is about enabling the practitioner to have the structure, balance, power and timing to simply avoid being hit and to hit or incapacitate what is trying to attack you - all seems pretty applicable to real life. Once you have learnt the system you gain enough understanding to take away things that you feel are not necessary...thats the same with all arts but the things one person discards are the things that work best for another...in that sense you may find some small amount of movements or perhaps a shape or two that aren't applicable for you personally but thats the best i can logically reason for the cause of your statement. Most civilians never want an altercation and are just happy to have the tools there ready to help if it is ever needed, generally with WC being a small system a level of proficiency isn't a life time to achieve, the methods of training also allow people to get past to much rationalisation and allow the brain to soak a lot of things up as a natural body reaction, again this seems practical and applicable to real modern lifestyles. I find it very hard to appreciate an opinion that suggests that that is not practical, what does lee do that is more practical? what does wing chun do that is not practical?
    some of the movements are less practical in a streefight situation, by real life situation i am refering to the average person, and if they get attacked on the street
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    Last edited by Segadoway; 01-19-2011 at 12:19 AM.

  3. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Segadoway View Post
    some of the movements are less practical in a streefight situation, by real life situation i am refering to the average person, and if they get attacked on the street
    what movements are you talking about?

    Are they just less practical for you? Or are they less practical for everyone?

    Does it apply to all real life situations? Or just the ones you envisage?

    I mean attacks vary so much as do people...what is the average person and attacks can be very different, wing chun doesn't give you a different tool for each possible attack, that would be impractical, instead it gives you a set of tools that are very adaptable. It brings me back to what i was saying about once the system is learnt you make it your own, its a personal thing, you can omit movements you find are not necessary and thus the whole thing is practical, however you may find others will keep things you omit as it works for them. Besides the use of training the movements expands self awareness and ability even if its something you don't use and that is a practical training element.

    What experience have you had of other wing chun? Is this an opinion you have built up personally or one you picked up from your father?
    Others walk the bow, I walk the string

  4. #49
    Registered User Segadoway's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by straightXed View Post
    what movements are you talking about?

    Are they just less practical for you? Or are they less practical for everyone?

    Does it apply to all real life situations? Or just the ones you envisage?

    I mean attacks vary so much as do people...what is the average person and attacks can be very different, wing chun doesn't give you a different tool for each possible attack, that would be impractical, instead it gives you a set of tools that are very adaptable. It brings me back to what i was saying about once the system is learnt you make it your own, its a personal thing, you can omit movements you find are not necessary and thus the whole thing is practical, however you may find others will keep things you omit as it works for them. Besides the use of training the movements expands self awareness and ability even if its something you don't use and that is a practical training element.

    What experience have you had of other wing chun? Is this an opinion you have built up personally or one you picked up from your father?
    more traditional styles of wing chun can be less practical is all im saying, it is my opinion that was sort of influenced by my father teaching me a different style as well
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    Last edited by Segadoway; 01-19-2011 at 12:19 AM.

  5. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Segadoway View Post
    more traditional styles of wing chun can be less practical is all im saying, it is my opinion that was sort of influenced by my father teaching me a different style as well
    I know thats all you are saying but you don't seem to be able to point at any movements or particular schools or lineages or anything to make what you are saying stand up. It comes across as a rather sweeping and unsubstantiated statement and the reason i have focussed on that is because those kind of statements breed ignorance. Thats why i asked you all the questions about your experience of this "less practical" art and the particulars of the movements and their practicality in reference to others etc.

    Its obvious i disagree with your opinion and have put forward the reasons for that and i guess it seems you have no real reasons to hold your opinion that you can share. So i guess we should just leave it at that.
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  6. #51
    Registered User Segadoway's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by straightXed View Post
    I know thats all you are saying but you don't seem to be able to point at any movements or particular schools or lineages or anything to make what you are saying stand up. It comes across as a rather sweeping and unsubstantiated statement and the reason i have focussed on that is because those kind of statements breed ignorance. Thats why i asked you all the questions about your experience of this "less practical" art and the particulars of the movements and their practicality in reference to others etc.

    Its obvious i disagree with your opinion and have put forward the reasons for that and i guess it seems you have no real reasons to hold your opinion that you can share. So i guess we should just leave it at that.
    yeah i don't have that good a knowledge of it, but there was a few styles (i'm really not sure of the name) who's movements seemed to be best for defending against other martial artists and not people in general

  7. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Segadoway View Post
    yeah i don't have that good a knowledge of it, but there was a few styles (i'm really not sure of the name) who's movements seemed to be best for defending against other martial artists and not people in general
    Perhaps thats just a training method that can be learnt from and those lessons could be, in actual fact, relative and applicable to "real life" situations. It would be very beneficial for your opinions validity and for my understanding if you could actually point to something that highlights what you claim. I personally feel that the majority of wing chun is highly applicable and useful in "real life" and thus dispels your claim.
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  8. #53
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    Thumbs up Tae-Kwon-Do

    Hi guys.

    Just wanted to post on that I have a Black Belt in Tae-Kwon-Do (a Korean martial art for people who don't know)and have studied it for 4 years. I don do it anymore tho.
    “Better to die standing, than to live on your knees.” Ernesto 'Che' Guevara

  9. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by straightXed View Post
    Perhaps thats just a training method that can be learnt from and those lessons could be, in actual fact, relative and applicable to "real life" situations. It would be very beneficial for your opinions validity and for my understanding if you could actually point to something that highlights what you claim. I personally feel that the majority of wing chun is highly applicable and useful in "real life" and thus dispels your claim.
    I agree, i don't know what the fuck i was on about then....
    My current view is that there is no best style, only people that are better at it, sure some styles may be easier to learn but if you are good enough at one style then it will be just as practical as another style.
    FUCK

  10. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by xJediAzzax View Post
    Hi guys.

    Just wanted to post on that I have a Black Belt in Tae-Kwon-Do (a Korean martial art for people who don't know)and have studied it for 4 years. I don do it anymore tho.
    This reminds me of an interesting conversation i had once, a guy i knew used to train heavily in karate, he held black belts in two styles of karate but he hadn't trained in about 7 years. He still considered himself black belt but i had this issue about how a black belt resembles abilty at a certain level of the art, so while i don't dispute his ability to use karate and i admire the dedication he put in i wondered if you could still consider yourself black belt. I mean 7 years out of training makes me think of it as more of a case as "was black belt" instead of "is black belt".

    TKD is interesting though, a work collegue is big into it and visits korea quite often, he has some good stories!!
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  11. #56
    Registered User Segadoway's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by straightXed View Post
    This reminds me of an interesting conversation i had once, a guy i knew used to train heavily in karate, he held black belts in two styles of karate but he hadn't trained in about 7 years. He still considered himself black belt but i had this issue about how a black belt resembles abilty at a certain level of the art, so while i don't dispute his ability to use karate and i admire the dedication he put in i wondered if you could still consider yourself black belt. I mean 7 years out of training makes me think of it as more of a case as "was black belt" instead of "is black belt".

    TKD is interesting though, a work collegue is big into it and visits korea quite often, he has some good stories!!
    I don't think he is a black belt, if he doesn't practice his art any more.......
    FUCK

  12. #57
    Rookie xMaggotAzzAx's Avatar
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    Tae-Kwon-Do is a bit different to Karate and Tae-Kwon-Do is more of a sport based martial art and is used in the olympics.

    As for considering myself a black belt, i still do as i think the techniques you train so hard on for that time stay with you for life and you can use them if necessary. I also do a bit of self-defence like arm locks, wrist locks etc. prefer TKD

    I wanna try a new martial art as well Muay Thai looks quite interesting.
    “Better to die standing, than to live on your knees.” Ernesto 'Che' Guevara

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    Quote Originally Posted by xJediAzzax View Post
    Tae-Kwon-Do is a bit different to Karate and Tae-Kwon-Do is more of a sport based martial art and is used in the olympics.

    As for considering myself a black belt, i still do as i think the techniques you train so hard on for that time stay with you for life and you can use them if necessary. I also do a bit of self-defence like arm locks, wrist locks etc. prefer TKD

    I wanna try a new martial art as well Muay Thai looks quite interesting.
    I don't think the difference between karate and TKD makes too much difference in this case. I mean the guy I work with who is big into TKD was a black belt way back in his early 20's and stopped, he started up again in his 40's and had to relearn a lot of stuff. He still knew a lot of it and understood it but there was still an element of relearning. In terms of blacjk belt denoting a standard its hard for it to do so if you are out of training for a long time.
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  14. #59
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    I hope he wasn't one of those people that go to a shitty dojo and get their black belt in 6 months....
    FUCK

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    Quote Originally Posted by Segadoway View Post
    I hope he wasn't one of those people that go to a shitty dojo and get their black belt in 6 months....

    Who are you talking to? Or about?
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