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Thread: School Straight Edge article

  1. #1
    Registered User Lost Prophet's Avatar
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    Exclamation School Straight Edge article

    I'm on my schools newspaper, and I wrote an article about straight edge as I know it, and it goes to print in a few days, so i want you guys to let me know what you think, please.

    ----------------
    "Revealing the Straight Edge"
    -by Quinn *****

    As the punk and hardcore scenes grow in popularity, various subcultures within each become more widespread and accepted by the American youth. One the fastest rising subcultures is Straight Edge, but despite its recent following, many people still don’t know what it is.

    Straight Edge is a philosophy that promotes a “poison free” lifestyle. Being poison free means not drinking, not smoking, not doing drugs, and refraining from promiscuous (or casual) sex. “Straight-Edgers” see this as the way teen life, and life in general, should be.

    “I just don’t understand why anyone would want to destroy their life for a quick high. There’s so much more to life than that!” said sophomore Ashley ******.

    Straight edge began with a song Ian MacKaye, singer for Minor Threat, wrote in 1981. The song is titled “Straight Edge”.

    I’m a person just like you
    But I’ve got better things to do
    Than sit around and [mess] with my head
    Hang out with the living dead
    Snort white [stuff] up my nose
    Pass out at the shows
    I don’t even think about speed
    That’s something I just don’t need

    I’ve got the straight edge

    I’m a person just like you
    But I’ve got better things to do
    Than sit around and smoke dope
    ‘Cause I know I can cope
    Laugh at the thought of eating ludes
    Laugh at the thought of sniffing glue
    Always gonna keep in touch
    Never want to use a crutch

    I’ve got the straight edge

    This song started a world-wide revolution and gave birth to a new subculture, but that was not MacKaye’s intent. He meant the song to be more of a way to tell listeners of his personal choices rather than the start of a movement. Incidentally, this was not the only thing MacKaye contributed to the birth of Straight Edge.

    The most recognizable symbol for straight edge started with an idea MacKaye presented to club owners in Washington DC. He proposed that instead of keeping teens out of shows where alcohol would be served, they be marked on the backs of their hands with black Xs to signify they were underage. Many club owners began doing so, and some of the original “Straight-Edgers” began voluntarily marking themselves with these Xs. The Xs showed others they were in favor of promoting a cleaner lifestyle. Those who follow the straight edge lifestyle still use this basic symbol, and some have even gotten tattoos “claiming” straight edge.

    “Me and my boyfriend both wear Xs on our hands all the time. It’s a kind of flag to tell people we’re clean,” said freshman Lauren ***** of Ceres.

    Another very common symbol for straight edge is sXe. Straight Edge, abbreviated with an X place in the center, is the second most common mark of being a “Straight-Edger.” sXe can be pronounced multiple ways, such as “straight edge” or “s-x-e”, but pronouncing it “sexy” is generally considered wrong.

    The least common method used to distinguish oneself as Straight Edge is the black or white bandana, usually put in the back left pocket or wrapped around the face. Because wearing bandanas is commonly misinterpreted as a gang sign, they are banned from schools and in turn “Straight-Edgers” are not seen wearing them very often at school.

    “I love my bandana,” said sophomore Melissa *****. “It makes a statement, and looks good at the same time.”

    Since the breakup of Minor threat in 1983, other bands have stood up and openly supported the poison free lifestyle. Bands like Youth of Today, Gorilla Biscuits, Earth Crisis, and Chain of Strength are among these bands to “claim the X”. In fact, the straight edge lifestyle is said to be so closely related to punk/hardcore music that it couldn’t survive without the music’s support.

    “Straight-Edgers” are often seen hardcore dancing at concerts. Two-stepping, slam dancing, and the infamous “crab walk” are all favorites of hardcore straight edge teens. This fun and often times odd looking activity attracts many people to explore this subculture, and is one of the main reasons for its spreading influence.

    “I was introduced to Straight Edge through the dancing. Some of the people I danced with would always wear bandanas and Xs, so I got interested and started asking questions,” said *****.

    Whether you claim it, bash it, or don’t know enough about it to care, the Straight Edge subculture is quickly becoming a dominant force in teen life, and sooner or later you will probably be asked one simple question…

    “Do you have the straight edge?”
    --------------------

    its not the best article, i realise, but let me know what you think anyway. thanks
    Last edited by Lost Prophet; 11-07-2005 at 06:57 PM.

  2. #2
    underdog XvagueprophetX's Avatar
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    is sxe really rising? i mean, i've been out of high school a long time, but to me it seems like it's been in decline for a while now. is it rising in high schools these days?
    "We stand and fight. Back to back. We take no shit. We stay tight. We stick together and deal with it. We use our heads and not our fists unless we're pushed. As one, we fight and we win".

  3. #3
    Administrator xsecx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lost Prophet
    I'm on my schools newspaper, and I wrote an article about straight edge as I know it, and it goes to print in a few days, so i want you guys to let me know what you think, please.

    ----------------
    "Revealing the Straight Edge"
    -by Quinn *****

    As the punk and hardcore scenes grow in popularity, various subcultures within each become more widespread and accepted by the American youth. One the fastest rising subcultures is Straight Edge, but despite its recent following, many people still don’t know what it is.

    Straight Edge is a philosophy that promotes a “poison free” lifestyle. Being poison free means not drinking, not smoking, not doing drugs, and refraining from promiscuous (or casual) sex. “Straight-Edgers” see this as the way teen life, and life in general, should be.

    “I just don’t understand why anyone would want to destroy their life for a quick high. There’s so much more to life than that!” said sophomore Ashley ******.

    Straight edge began with a song Ian MacKaye, singer for Minor Threat, wrote in 1981. The song is titled “Straight Edge”.

    I’m a person just like you
    But I’ve got better things to do
    Than sit around and [mess] with my head
    Hang out with the living dead
    Snort white [stuff] up my nose
    Pass out at the shows
    I don’t even think about speed
    That’s something I just don’t need

    I’ve got the straight edge

    I’m a person just like you
    But I’ve got better things to do
    Than sit around and smoke dope
    ‘Cause I know I can cope
    Laugh at the thought of eating ludes
    Laugh at the thought of sniffing glue
    Always gonna keep in touch
    Never want to use a crutch

    I’ve got the straight edge

    This song started a world-wide revolution and gave birth to a new subculture, but that was not MacKaye’s intent. He meant the song to be more of a way to tell listeners of his personal choices rather than the start of a movement. Incidentally, this was not the only thing MacKaye contributed to the birth of Straight Edge.

    The most recognizable symbol for straight edge started with an idea MacKaye presented to club owners in Washington DC. He proposed that instead of keeping teens out of shows where alcohol would be served, they be marked on the backs of their hands with black Xs to signify they were underage. Many club owners began doing so, and some of the original “Straight-Edgers” began voluntarily marking themselves with these Xs. The Xs showed others they were in favor of promoting a cleaner lifestyle. Those who follow the straight edge lifestyle still use this basic symbol, and some have even gotten tattoos “claiming” straight edge.

    “Me and my boyfriend both wear Xs on our hands all the time. It’s a kind of flag to tell people we’re clean,” said freshman Lauren ***** of Ceres.

    Another very common symbol for straight edge is sXe. Straight Edge, abbreviated with an X place in the center, is the second most common mark of being a “Straight-Edger.” sXe can be pronounced multiple ways, such as “straight edge” or “s-x-e”, but pronouncing it “sexy” is generally considered wrong.

    The least common method used to distinguish oneself as Straight Edge is the black or white bandana, usually put in the back left pocket or wrapped around the face. Because wearing bandanas is commonly misinterpreted as a gang sign, they are banned from schools and in turn “Straight-Edgers” are not seen wearing them very often at school.

    “I love my bandana,” said sophomore Melissa *****. “It makes a statement, and looks good at the same time.”

    Since the breakup of Minor threat in 1983, other bands have stood up and openly supported the poison free lifestyle. Bands like Youth of Today, Gorilla Biscuits, Earth Crisis, and Chain of Strength are among these bands to “claim the X”. In fact, the straight edge lifestyle is said to be so closely related to punk/hardcore music that it couldn’t survive without the music’s support.

    “Straight-Edgers” are often seen hardcore dancing at concerts. Two-stepping, slam dancing, and the infamous “crab walk” are all favorites of hardcore straight edge teens. This fun and often times odd looking activity attracts many people to explore this subculture, and is one of the main reasons for its spreading influence.

    “I was introduced to Straight Edge through the dancing. Some of the people I danced with would always wear bandanas and Xs, so I got interested and started asking questions,” said *****.

    Whether you claim it, bash it, or don’t know enough about it to care, the Straight Edge subculture is quickly becoming a dominant force in teen life, and sooner or later you will probably be asked one simple question…

    “Do you have the straight edge?”
    --------------------

    its not the best article, i realise, but let me know what you think anyway. thanks
    over all it's really good. the bandana thing might be true around you, but it's not a widescale thing. hardcore kids in general do/have worn them and it's not directly a straight edge thing. I'd probably not mention Chain of Strength since they have a dubious history at best, but I would include some of the CA bands like Unity, Uniform Choice, Internal Affairs and/or Carry On for a handful. Also MacKaye didn't come up the idea of X's, he saw it while he was on tour in cali and brought it back here.

  4. #4
    Administrator xsecx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by XvagueprophetX
    is sxe really rising? i mean, i've been out of high school a long time, but to me it seems like it's been in decline for a while now. is it rising in high schools these days?
    it's not in a decline at all right now. in fact there are ton more kids claiming now than there were a few years ago, however a bunch of them have no actual clue what straight edge is, which is why I'm really impressed with this article.

  5. #5
    Lawn clippings. GuitarxCore's Avatar
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    I've watched sXe interest incline in the period of 1 year just living here. It's pretty righteous.
    I hate being loved by the hateful.

  6. #6
    xXx One Sick Puppy xXx stepinsideissue's Avatar
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    Yeah kid over all a pretty good article. I'm very impressed. It's good to see some new and young blood that actually has some understanding to what sXe really is. Too many of the new kids are really oblivious to the true meaning to sXe. Sounds like you got a good head on your shoulders. Keep up the great writing and good luck with this article.
    This so called shit is what I live for. It's why I'm alive. I'll never smother the fire forever burning inside.

    I'm at the point where I'm sucked in. By the message I get this passion.

    The fury is mine. It keeps me alive. I can't breathe till I release what's inside.

  7. #7
    Duchess of Adventures xvunderx's Avatar
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    I'm with Dusty on this one, nice work! despite a few minor things like the origin of the X, this is still way more informed than the crap that makes it on TV shows like Geraldo.

  8. #8
    Registered User Lost Prophet's Avatar
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    yeah, thanx guys. love the input so far.

    and the origin of the X i had to simplify. i am aware that he picked it up on the west coast and brought it back to DC, but i had to dumb it down a little because no one cares at my school.

    and the bandana thing is more of a local thing here, your right. in most places its just a hardcore symbol, but here white or black is generally used for sXe

    and another thanks to stepinsideissue... most people call me a poser becase im only recently edge and i used to be all preppy back in the day. it feels good to have someone say i know my stuff.

  9. #9
    xXx One Sick Puppy xXx stepinsideissue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lost Prophet
    yeah, thanx guys. love the input so far.

    and the origin of the X i had to simplify. i am aware that he picked it up on the west coast and brought it back to DC, but i had to dumb it down a little because no one cares at my school.

    and the bandana thing is more of a local thing here, your right. in most places its just a hardcore symbol, but here white or black is generally used for sXe

    and another thanks to stepinsideissue... most people call me a poser becase im only recently edge and i used to be all preppy back in the day. it feels good to have someone say i know my stuff.

    I don't see how people can call you poser when you seem to really know your stuff and atleast grasp the whole concept of sXe. Too many kids come on here and really have no clue to what sXe really is and know it's roots. You get some 16yr. old kid that says they've been edge 16yrs. which isn't possible, they've never been to a show, and they have no idea who Minor Threat even is. They are the really posers my friend. Besides you gotta start some where right.
    This so called shit is what I live for. It's why I'm alive. I'll never smother the fire forever burning inside.

    I'm at the point where I'm sucked in. By the message I get this passion.

    The fury is mine. It keeps me alive. I can't breathe till I release what's inside.

  10. #10
    Registered User xRodboi!x's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by Lost Prophet
    I'm on my schools newspaper, and I wrote an article about straight edge as I know it, and it goes to print in a few days, so i want you guys to let me know what you think, please.

    ----------------
    "Revealing the Straight Edge"
    -by Quinn *****

    As the punk and hardcore scenes grow in popularity, various subcultures within each become more widespread and accepted by the American youth. One the fastest rising subcultures is Straight Edge, but despite its recent following, many people still don’t know what it is.

    Straight Edge is a philosophy that promotes a “poison free” lifestyle. Being poison free means not drinking, not smoking, not doing drugs, and refraining from promiscuous (or casual) sex. “Straight-Edgers” see this as the way teen life, and life in general, should be.

    “I just don’t understand why anyone would want to destroy their life for a quick high. There’s so much more to life than that!” said sophomore Ashley ******.

    Straight edge began with a song Ian MacKaye, singer for Minor Threat, wrote in 1981. The song is titled “Straight Edge”.

    I’m a person just like you
    But I’ve got better things to do
    Than sit around and [mess] with my head
    Hang out with the living dead
    Snort white [stuff] up my nose
    Pass out at the shows
    I don’t even think about speed
    That’s something I just don’t need

    I’ve got the straight edge

    I’m a person just like you
    But I’ve got better things to do
    Than sit around and smoke dope
    ‘Cause I know I can cope
    Laugh at the thought of eating ludes
    Laugh at the thought of sniffing glue
    Always gonna keep in touch
    Never want to use a crutch

    I’ve got the straight edge

    This song started a world-wide revolution and gave birth to a new subculture, but that was not MacKaye’s intent. He meant the song to be more of a way to tell listeners of his personal choices rather than the start of a movement. Incidentally, this was not the only thing MacKaye contributed to the birth of Straight Edge.

    The most recognizable symbol for straight edge started with an idea MacKaye presented to club owners in Washington DC. He proposed that instead of keeping teens out of shows where alcohol would be served, they be marked on the backs of their hands with black Xs to signify they were underage. Many club owners began doing so, and some of the original “Straight-Edgers” began voluntarily marking themselves with these Xs. The Xs showed others they were in favor of promoting a cleaner lifestyle. Those who follow the straight edge lifestyle still use this basic symbol, and some have even gotten tattoos “claiming” straight edge.

    “Me and my boyfriend both wear Xs on our hands all the time. It’s a kind of flag to tell people we’re clean,” said freshman Lauren ***** of Ceres.

    Another very common symbol for straight edge is sXe. Straight Edge, abbreviated with an X place in the center, is the second most common mark of being a “Straight-Edger.” sXe can be pronounced multiple ways, such as “straight edge” or “s-x-e”, but pronouncing it “sexy” is generally considered wrong.

    The least common method used to distinguish oneself as Straight Edge is the black or white bandana, usually put in the back left pocket or wrapped around the face. Because wearing bandanas is commonly misinterpreted as a gang sign, they are banned from schools and in turn “Straight-Edgers” are not seen wearing them very often at school.

    “I love my bandana,” said sophomore Melissa *****. “It makes a statement, and looks good at the same time.”

    Since the breakup of Minor threat in 1983, other bands have stood up and openly supported the poison free lifestyle. Bands like Youth of Today, Gorilla Biscuits, Earth Crisis, and Chain of Strength are among these bands to “claim the X”. In fact, the straight edge lifestyle is said to be so closely related to punk/hardcore music that it couldn’t survive without the music’s support.

    “Straight-Edgers” are often seen hardcore dancing at concerts. Two-stepping, slam dancing, and the infamous “crab walk” are all favorites of hardcore straight edge teens. This fun and often times odd looking activity attracts many people to explore this subculture, and is one of the main reasons for its spreading influence.

    “I was introduced to Straight Edge through the dancing. Some of the people I danced with would always wear bandanas and Xs, so I got interested and started asking questions,” said *****.

    Whether you claim it, bash it, or don’t know enough about it to care, the Straight Edge subculture is quickly becoming a dominant force in teen life, and sooner or later you will probably be asked one simple question…

    “Do you have the straight edge?”
    --------------------

    its not the best article, i realise, but let me know what you think anyway. thanks
    pretty good job dude!keep on informing people about sxe,because i read some articles about sxe that made me puke!i read that they were all like hardlines,that they were racists,killing foreigners an people who smoke,that marilyn manson was their leader and that xxx was equal as kkk,and all that crap in the same article
    xxxstraight judes are shouting at your earsxxx
    "more than a music,it's a way of life"
    Warm Spit:Punk Hardcore old school from besancon city![/COLOR]

  11. #11
    Registered User xRodboi!x's Avatar
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    Red face

    i wanted to know if my english is understandable?
    "more than a music,it's a way of life"
    Warm Spit:Punk Hardcore old school from besancon city![/COLOR]

  12. #12
    Registered User Lost Prophet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xRodboi!x
    i wanted to know if my english is understandable?
    yeah, it's better than mine
    =D

  13. #13
    xXx One Sick Puppy xXx stepinsideissue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xRodboi!x
    pretty good job dude!keep on informing people about sxe,because i read some articles about sxe that made me puke!i read that they were all like hardlines,that they were racists,killing foreigners an people who smoke,that marilyn manson was their leader and that xxx was equal as kkk,and all that crap in the same article
    xxxstraight judes are shouting at your earsxxx
    Yeah thats a load of crap. Were do people get these ideas? And for the record I think your english is just fine too.
    This so called shit is what I live for. It's why I'm alive. I'll never smother the fire forever burning inside.

    I'm at the point where I'm sucked in. By the message I get this passion.

    The fury is mine. It keeps me alive. I can't breathe till I release what's inside.

  14. #14
    Registered User Lost Prophet's Avatar
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    the paper with the article came out on friday, and i have since gotten some good words. thanks guys

  15. #15
    Registered User xRodboi!x's Avatar
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    Talking soia rules

    Quote Originally Posted by stepinsideissue
    Yeah thats a load of crap. Were do people get these ideas? And for the record I think your english is just fine too.
    but the answer i plain to see
    maybe if the weren't too blind they would see what is ee
    i see the homeless livin' out on the streets
    in every corner they're asking for money
    'try to help them whenever i can
    sometimes i can't afford to help myself
    "more than a music,it's a way of life"
    Warm Spit:Punk Hardcore old school from besancon city![/COLOR]

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